Kirsten Christensen

Kirsten Christensen

Graduate Student

Kirsten is a third year Ph.D. student in the Clinical Psychology program at UMass Boston. She is originally from East Brunswick, NJ and she received her B.A. in psychology from The College of New Jersey. Kirsten is a recent recipient of a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and her research interests involve positive youth development and youth-staff relationships in urban after-school programs. Kirsten’s clinical interests include working with adolescents and young adults to manage adjustment and transitions, identity development, interpersonal/family relationships, and academic-related concerns.

Matt Hagler

Matt Hagler

Graduate Student

Matt is a 4th year doctoral candidate in clinical psychology at UMass Boston. He graduated from Sewanee, the University of the South, Phi Beta Kappa and summa cum laude with undergraduate degrees in psychology and English literature. Before starting graduate school, he spent a year living in Muğla, Turkey on a Fulbright student fellowship and served as a project manager for the Life Paths Appalachian Research Center. Matt’s current research is supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship and focuses on the potential for mentoring relationships to both widen and bridge socioeconomic disparities. His clinical interests include working with adolescents and young adults on issues of identity, relationships, and adjustment, as well as the early detection and intervention for risk of serious mental illness.

Samantha Burton

Samantha Burton

Graduate Student

Sam is a 5th year graduate student at UMass Boston’s Clinical Psychology PhD program. She is originally from Longmeadow, MA and attended the University of Chicago for her undergraduate degree in psychology. Her research interests include mentoring relationship terminations and outcomes, as well as the impact of discrimination in mentoring relationships. Her clinical interests include working with children, adolescents, and young adults experiencing difficulties with anxiety, mood, relationships, and adjustment.

Cyanea Poon

Cyanea Poon

Graduate Student

Cyanea is a 1st-year graduate student at UMass Boston’s Clinical Psychology Ph.D. program. Born and raised in Hong Kong, she graduated with a BA in psychology from Wheaton College in 2016. While there, she also earned a certificate in Human Needs and Global Resources for her research with trauma-exposed youths in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Cyanea is interested in studying how support networks and non-parental adults affect developmental trajectories of youths in vulnerable settings.

Justin_Preston

Justin Preston

Graduate Student

Justin is a 2nd year graduate student at UMass Boston’s Clinical Psychology Doctoral Program. Hailing from Ada, Ohio, he completed his undergraduate studies at Connecticut College with a degree in Psychology. Later, he received his Master’s in Human Development and Social Intervention from New York University’s Steinhardt School in New York City. Justin’s research interests travel along two interrelated tracks: the long-term impacts of mass trauma on mental health and the ways that social support and interpersonal relationships can be used to transition from relief to recovery, and the use of mentoring as a context for fostering social inclusion in community settings domestically and internationally. His clinical interests include working with youth and adults who have experienced trauma and other adverse experiences.

Rachel Rubin

Rachel Rubin

Graduate Student

Rachel is a 4th year graduate student in UMass Boston’s Clinical Psychology PhD program. She is originally from the suburbs of Cleveland, OH and attended Tufts University for both her undergraduate degree in Psychology and Child Development as well as her Master’s degree in Child Study & Human Development. Her research is focused on the formation and quality of youth-adult relationships, with a specific interest in in the camper-counselor relationship that exists in summer camp contexts. Her clinical interests include working with children and adolescents experiencing difficulties with anxiety, mood, and navigating interpersonal relationships. Rachel is particularly interested in working with youth who identify across the LGBTQ spectrum.